Cumberland is located in mountainous Allegany County, Maryland, at the base of converging mountain ridges at the confluence of Wills Creek and the Potomac River. Established in 1787, the city conforms in its layout to the rugged topography within which it is situated. George Washington truly did sleep here--his headquarters during the French and Indian War were located at Fort Cumberland. The fort, and later the city, took its name from the Duke of Cumberland, son of King George II of Great Britain. Known as the "Gateway to the West," Cumberland gained prominence during the 19th century as a major transportation center and as an important economic focus for the region. The city was the site of the first National Road, the western terminus of the Chesapeake & Ohio (C&O) Canal, and a center for the railroad industry.



THE CLINTONS APPEARING IN EARLY AMERICAN RECORDS

Transcribed by Joanne Clinton Truman (died 1 August 2007 in Seabrook, Harris, Texas)

By Guy Clinton (1867 . . . .)

Sources and Arrangement

The material in this write-up is presented in chronological order; but after beginning a given line, the descendants of that line are discussed until a convenient breaking point is reached.

The following sources of information have been consulted: The New England Historical and Genealogical Register; John Camden Hotten Ship Lists of Emigrants from England to America from 1600 to 1700; North Carolina State Records; Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution; the Vital Records of Ipswick, Mass. and of New Haven, Conn.; Pennsylvania Muster Roll of the Revolution; Pennsylvania Archives; New York Genealogical and Geographical records; Force's American Archives; Old Records Division of the War Department; United States Census Records; Land Office Records; Pension Records; History of Western Maryland, Scharf's; James Remwick's: Life of DeWitt Clinton; Report of Charles A. Clinton at the Centennial Celebration of the Founding of Little Britain, N.Y.; Genealogy of Pelham-Clinton, Duke of New Castle, published about 1780.

These notes are abstracts of the records consulted. An effort has been made to interpret the information and to avoid unnecessary repetitions.

Migrations and Earlier Settlers

In the New England Register Vol 40, George Marshall, London, Eng. reported a baptismal registry at Alderly, Eng.: Jone (Joan?) Clinton, June 11, 1547, daughter of Thomas Clinton. The connection with the American Clintons is not clear, though the Register thought it to be of sufficient importance to publish.

The first mention of the migration of the Clintons to America is found in Hotten's "Original List of Persons of Quality, etc. Emigrants from England to America between 1600 and 1700. In this it is stated that Richard Clinton (Clynton) embarked for the Barbados Feb. 17, 1634, on the good ship Hopewell, commanded by Capt. Thomas Wood. In another entry it is stated that Jo Clinton embarked May 25, 1635, to be transported to St. Christopher on the Matthew of London; Richard Goodlad was the master. The announced destinations of these two ships does not make it clear that these two Clintons actually reached the American mainland; however, the destinations mentioned were commonly used as intermediate stages of a journey to the English colonies.

In Vol. VI of the New England Register, there is listed, among the settlers of Essex and Old Norfolk counties of Massachusetts, Lawrence Clinton who came over in 1666 and Andrew Clinton who came in 1670.

In Vol. 30 of the Register, it is stated that Rachael Hatfield married Lawrence Clinton who won his way into her graces by his physical beauty and his boasting professions of his riches and high connections. In the Vital Records of Ipswick, Mass. the date of this marriage is given as December 1665. The Hatfields had come over from England (Lincolnshire) in 1658 and had located in the Town of Ipswick. Lawrence and Rachael are the traditional ancestors of most of the New England Clintons. In Vol. 42, on Feb. 9, 1676 during King Phillips War, Lawrence Clinton is given credit for his participation in the capture of a band of Indians. Maj. Walden, the commander of the detachment reports the event in a letter. He (Lawrence) was listed as a freeman (voter) of Ipswick in 1678. In the history of Ipswick, Vol. I, it is recorded that "Old Rachel Clinton was arrested as a witch in 1692; she was saved by the action of her friends who, induced the great Cotton Mother to intercede for her.

In Vol. 43 of the Register (p. 245) referring to the genealogy of Northup, N.Y., it is stated that Abigail Cornell married Lawrence Clinton; their children were: Sarah born in August 1747, Simeon born in February 1749, Abigail born in August 1751, and Samuel born in July 1754. This Lawrence was doubtless a descendant of the Lawrence who served in King Phillip's War. It seems probable that Samuel Clinton mentioned here is the same as the soldier in Capt. Elijah Hinman's Co. of the 13th Conn. Regiment; he enlisted Aug. 19, 1777 and was discharged Sept. 3, 1777. The census of 1790 contains the names of both Lawrence and Samuel Clinton in Woodridge Town. New Haven County. A Lawrence Clinton also resided in New Haven City; furthermore, Samuel Clinton, with a family of eight, lived in Wolcott Town of the same county in 1800.

Chronologically the next event to be noted is the coming of Charles Clinton (1690-1773) on the "George and Ann" which sailed from Dublin for Philadelphia May 29, 1729. He came from Corbey-Langford County, Ireland. His father had received a grant of land from Queen Ann. He paid the passage on the ship of ninety of the immigrants. After a stormy voyage of 135 days on which many of the passengers died of hunger or sickness, one son and one daughter of Clinton died. He finally bargained with the piratical Captain for a landing at Cape Cod. Two years later he removed to Little Britain, N.Y.; he soon became a leader in his community and an active servant of the Colony. He became Surveyor of the Colony; while resurveying the Livingstone tract, he spent the night with Cornelius Knickerbocker, the famous character in Washington Irving's book. This Charles Clinton became the ancestor of three famous American: General James Clinton, a major general of the American Revolution, George Clinton, Vice President of the United States under Jefferson and Madison and Governor of New York during and after the Revolution, and the third was DeWitt Clinton who served successively as Mayor of New York City, United States Senator, and the Governor of New York who built the Erie Canal; he as also a candidate for President against John Quincy Adams.

George Clinton, a brother of the seventh Earl of Lincoln, was Royal Governor of the New York colony from 1743 to 1755. Neighborly visits were paid to him by Charles Clinton, and it was for him that he named his youngest son; it is recorded that they were able to trace a common ancestry, though the actual relationship is not stated. The grandfather of Charles Clinton was one William Clinton who suffered banishment from England because he espoused the cause of King Charles I in the civil war with Cormwell. In Vol. 51 of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Records, it is stated that this William Clinton was serving in the army in Spain with the Duke of York (King James II) during this period of banishment. It is also there suggested that he may have been the son of Elizabeth (Hickman) Clinton. A connection with the Earl of Lincoln may be inferred from the fact that Theohpilus Clinton, the fourth Earl of Lincoln, had a cousin Norreys and a cousin William. Both Theohpilus and Norreys were tried for treason for their service to King Charles I. This fact fixed them as of the same generation and it therefore seems strongly probable that William the half-brother of Norreys (and son of Elizabeth (Hickman) Clinton) was the same person as the grandfather of the Charles Clinton of whom we have been speaking; however, it is stated in the genealogy of the Duke of Newcastle that this brother of Norreys died without issue. Since the William who was the father of the American line was in banishment, it was easy to infer that he was dead; when he returned to Scotland he married a Miss Kennedy, and a little later he moved to Ireland. Years afterward James Clinton, his son, returned to England and made claim to Charles II for the return of his father's estate. The claim was disallowed; whatever may be the exact facts in the case, the effect on James Clinton is not in doubt. Although his family had always been Torries, he became a Whig and a dissenter. He married Elizabeth Smith, daughter of one of Cromwell's captains. They raised their only son Charles to be a liberal in politics, and as we have seen, he set his face toward America. His family used the same coat of arms as that of the Earls of Lincoln.

In Boltons "Immigrants to New England" it appears that one Francis Clinton came from Ireland to Boston in 1730. This practically ends the migration records of the Clintons, we next take up their war records.

OLD RECORDS OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT

The names appearing in the index cards are as follows:

Governor Clinton of New York

General Clinton of the New York and Pennsylvania Militia

Alexander Clinton, Ensign of Malcom's New York regiment of Continental troops.

Alexander Clinton, Lieutenant

Alexander Clinton, Ensign of the Second Artillery Regiment of Continental troops.

(All the Alexanders appear to refer to the same person.)

Allen Clinton, Private in a Connecticut regiment

Anthony Clinton, South Carolina

George Clinton, Brigadier General of miscellaneous troops

George Clinton, General of Thomas's New York Regiment

George Clinton, General of McClaughry's Regiment of New York Militia

George Clinton, General of Nicol's New York Regiment

George Clinton, General of Walton's Company of New Jersey

George Clinton, General of the Third New York levies

(All of the General George Clintons refer to the same man)

George Clinton, Private of the German Battalion (Pa.-Md).



The name is also spelled Klinton



George Clinton Sargeant of Mills Detachment

George Clinton, First Regiment of New Jersey

James Clinton, General of the Fourth Regiment of Dragoons.

James Clinton, Colonel of McClaughry's Regiment

James Clinton, Brigadier of the Second New York Regiment

James Clinton, Colonel of the Third New York Regiment

James Clinton, General of miscellaneous troops



(All of the last five undoubtedly refer to the same man)



John Clinton, Sargeant of Willetts' New York Regiment

John Clinton, Private in Van Schoon's Regiment, Albany Co., N.Y.

John Clinton of Whitcomb's Massachusetts Regiment

John Clinton, Second Artillery Regt. of Continental troops

John Clinton, Private of Fifth New York Regiment

Joseph Clinton, First New York Regiment

Joseph Clinton, Private of Third New York Regiment

Joseph Clinton, Corporal of Third Connecticut Regiment

Joseph Clinton. Sixth Connecticut Regiment (The last three may refer to the same man; the service was not simultaneous.)

Levi Clinton, Private Second Connecticut Regiment

Matthew Clinton, Private First Pennsylvania Regiment

Matthew Clinton, Third Pennsylvania Regiment

Nathaniel Clinton, Fifth South Carolina Regiment

Peter Clinton, Private Drayton's New York Battalion

Samuel Clinton, Thirteenth Connecticut Militia

Thomas Clinton, Fourth Maryland Regiment

William Clinton, Field's Regiment of Dutchess County New York Militia

Besides these many other soldiers appear in the other records of the states; there were also some in the Indian Wars before the Revolution

SOLDIER'S RECORDS

PENNSYLVANIA MARYLAND AND NEW JERSEY

In the Pennsylvania Muster Roll we find a Captain William Clinton who was one of the officers of the Associated Regiments from Chester County, Pa in the Indian Wars of 1747-1748. These regiments were commanded by Colonel William Moore and Colonel Andrew McDowell. It appears that the counties took the initiative in raising forces to meet the Indian troubles arising from the "Walking Purchase" and other departures from the William Penn policy. We are indebted to Col. Samuel Miles for much interesting information concerning military expeditions in Pennsylvania during the French and Indian War. At 16 years of age he served as an enlisted man in the force sent by the Colony to Easton in 1755 under Benjamin Franklin. This was immediately after Franklin's return from the disastrous Braddock expedition in western Pennsylvania. In 1758 Miles commanded a company in the expedition under General Forbes which captured Fort Duquesne after which the name was changed to Fort Pitt. William Clinton also participated in this expedition as a Lieutenant in Captain Hasslet's Company from Chester County. The Battalion in which he served was commanded by Colonel James Burd. Col. Miles recites that the men threatened mutiny near Chamber's, now Chambersburg; the trouble was adjusted by arrangements for the payment of the men when they reached Fort London. He also mentions a battle with the Indians and French at Ligonier, now a summer resort near Johnstown, Pa.

This is doubtless the same William Clinton who bought about 500 acres of land in Paxtang Township on the Susquehanna River opposite the present site of Harrisburg in 1762. Harrisburg was founded about 20 years later; at that time the land was in Lancaster County. When his estate was liquidated in 1766, this land was sold to James Burd. The estate was administered by his widow Sarah who then resided in Philadelphia; he was said to have been a blacksmith, a rather profitable trade in pioneer days. We can then see that both he and James Burd lost little time in acquiring some of the new land they had passed over in their military expedition.

In Book O, page 56 of the Frederick, Md. County Registry of Deeds we find this entry: Feb. 7, 1771 Joseph Reynolds gave a bill of sale to Charles Clinton for one bay mare and one copper still for 28 pounds and 18 shillings Pennsylvania money. Reynolds was a resident of Antitam District, now of Washington County. In Scharf's History of Western Maryland we find that Charles Clinton became head of a committee (1775) for Cumberland Hundred (then in Frederick County) to raise funds to buy arms and ammunition which were required by the Maryland Council of Safety. In Force's American Archives we find that the Council of Safety commissioned him Captain of Militia July 27, 1776. He was said to have been from Skipton or Shipton District; this name is no longer known in that region but it was undoubtedly in the neighborhood of Cumberland. In the Pennsylvania Archives 6th. S. Vol. 5 Pages 310 and 320 we find that he had become Captain of the Eighth Company of Fayette County (Pa.) Militia 1791-1792. He had bought several tracts of land in Union Township of Fayette County in 1784-1792, and in the deeds he gave Washington County Md as his residence. This fact identifies him as the same man referred to in the records just cited.

Thomas Clinton was a private in Captain Samuel Goodman's Company of Colonel Josias Carvel-Hall's Fourth Maryland Reg. He enlisted June 1, 1778 for the war. He was placed on the pension roll April 25, 1818; his annual allowance was $96.00; he resided in Allegheny County when he received his pension. Soon after the Revolution the Maryland legislature voted him tract No. 1108 consisting of fifty acres and located just west of Cumberland. The index of County records in Allegheny county contains one and one-half pages of references to land transactions by Thomas and Catherine and by William and Sarah Clinton, extending from 1794 to about 1856. His residence suggests relationship to Charles Clinton; he was at the proper age to be a son or nephew. Scharf comments on the quality of Maryland soldiers: "The Frederick troops were actively engaged in the campaign of 1779, and were transferred with the rest of the Maryland line in 1780 to the South where they once more illustrated the quality of Maryland courage."(Circumstantal evidence suggests that this Clinton individual is Margaret Clinton's grandfather. jm)

In Vol. I page 129 6th S. of Penn. Archives, John Clinton is listed as a soldier of the Second Battalion of Philadelphia Militia in the service of the United Sates at Charleston S.C. In Vo. 4, page 204 he is listed as a Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Collins Company of Light Infantry, being a part of the second Regiment of the Pennsylvania Militia of Fayette County in 1790. In the census of 1800 we find him residing on land which had been bought some years earlier by Charles Clinton. We infer that he was an older son (brother handwritten in) of Charles Clinton who had not moved to Maryland with his father.

In Vol. I page 899 6th S. Penn Archives, John Clinton is listed as a private in Capt. William Johnson's Company from White Marsh Township of Philadelphia County. The Colonial Records of Marriages show that he was married to Ann Finny Nov. 15, 1775. In Vol 15 and 16, 3d S it is shown that he paid taxes in 1780 and 1781 in White Marsh Township. In the census of 1790 we find Ann Clinton a widow with a family dependent upon her.

In Vol. I page 99, 6th S., Joseph Clinton is listed as a private in Captain George Taylor's Company of the First Regiment. He was called into active service July 2, 1781. In Vo. 9, page 327 his widow, Emma Mary Clinton, is mentioned as a pensioner. They were married at Christs Church in Philadelphia, Dec. 19, 1784.

In Vol. 11, page 127, 3d S. we find the name of James Clinton in the London Britain (Township) of Chester County, Pa. on the tax list of 1765. The index reference indicates that he was also listed as a "smith" in the Middle Ward of Philadelphia in 1769. In the Penn. Muster Roll he appears as a private in Captain Stearns Company of the Fourth Penn Regiment. He was granted a Federal pension under Act of 1818, April 21, 1819 at which time he was 82 years of age and resided in New Jersey. In Vol. 3 of 3d S. he is listed as one entitled to receive 200 acres of land for his services in the Pennsylvania line during the Revolution.

The Old Records Division of the War Department mentions George Clinton as a private in Captain Henry Foster's Company of the German Battalion (Pa-Md) which was commanded by Colonel Nicholas. He was transferred to a new company July 19, 1777; this was commanded by Colonel Baron Arnndt. He deserted Aug. 7, 1777.

Matthew Clinton was a private in Capt. Thomas L. Moore's Company of the Third Penn. Regiment. He was recruited at Yellow Springs, and received depreciation pay. Vol. 4 page 125 5th S.

In Vol 2 page 874 6th S, (?) Patrick Clinton appears in the list of soldiers serving in the "Flying Camp" on Long Island, Aug. 1776. He was in Capt. Wm. William's Third Company of the Sixth Battalion of Philadelphia Militia.

Samuel Clinton, a carpenter and boat builder, is listed as a tax payer in North Liberty, West Liberty, and in the City of Philadelphia from 1769 to 1782. The references are in Volumes 14 and 15 of the 5 D S. References are made to four Samuel Clintons as soldiers, two of them as Samuel Junior. The Senior was a boat-builder and belonged to the "home guard." He was reported "absent" at some of the meetings of the company. In 1777 he enrolled in Capt. John Eyre's Company of Artillery.

Samuel Clinton is listed as a Second Lieutenant in Capt. Ogborn's Company of Artillery Aug. 10, 1780, Vol. 1, page 559. He was promoted to First Lieut. April 25, 1783.

In Vol. 1 page 351 Samuel Clinton Jr. is listed as a sargeant in Peter Brown's Battery of Artillery; he later became Captain of the Fifth Battery. He may have been the same as the Samuel Clinton who married Mary Harrison Jan 15, 1786 at Christ Church, Philadelphia.

[INSERTED HAND WRITTEN PAGE;

Inscriptions in the Burial Grounds of Christ Church, Philadelphia, Pa by Clark

Page 309: In Memory of William Clinton who departed this life Sept 11, 1764, aged 50 years.

Page 310: In memory of Sarah Clinton who departed this life 17th Jan. 1790, Aged 65 years.

Unless the old records were read wrong in New Haven Conn, the Wm. Clinton of Philadelphia could not have been the William, son of Joseph born May 15, 1726.]

Certain warranties for land donated to soldiers for their revolutionary services were found in the original records of the Land Office, Department of Internal Affairs of the State of Pennsylvania Vol. 24 page 201. Four hundred acres of land in Luserne County were granted to each of the following Feb. 18, 1793: Peter Clinton, Joseph Clinton, Paul Clinton and Henry Clinton.

In "New Jersey in the Revolution" appear the names of Benjamin Clinton and George Clinton who served in Capt. Waldron's troops of Light Dragoons from Monmouth, N.J. In "The Old Records, Etc.", it is also stated that George Clinton served in Waldron's troops. Peter Clinton was a private in Captain Imlay's Company of Dayton's Battalion of the New Jersey Forces. He enlisted March 26, 1776 and was discharged Oct. 1, 1778.

(Ref. page 10) William Clinton and his wife Sarah were witnesses to a baptism in the Deerpark Dutch Reformed Church in Ulster County, N.Y. June 25, 1757. Alexander Clinton, son of General James Clinton, was born at Deerpark in 1765. These facts suggest contact if not relationship of these two families. In the New Haven (Conn.) Vital Records we find that William, son of Joseph Clinton, was born May 15, 1726. This would be about the time we would expect the Pennsylvania William Clinton to be born, and as the records do not contain any other William Clinton of this approximate age, we may reasonably associate the two.

Another William Clinton, a weaver, reported his property for taxation in London Grove (Avondale) Township Chester County 1765 to 1768. He is probably the same as he who bought and sold a 200 acre tract of land in London, Britain Township of the same county in 1762.

NEW YORK

In "New York in the Revolution", we find that Charles Clinton Jr. served as Surveyor General and resigned Mar 21, 1781. It is presumed that he was the elder brother of General James Clinton; he had served as a doctor in the English Army at Havana during the French and Indian War; he had no children.

Alexander Clinton, the eldest son of General James Clinton, was commissioned Ensign in the First New York Regiment Sept. 29, 1780; he was in Capt Gregg's Company while the regiment was commanded by Col. Goose (?) VanSchaick. He was transferred to Col. Lamb's Regiment June 29, 1781, and was at that time promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant. He was mustered out at Annapolis, Md. in June 1784. He served his uncle George Clinton as Private Secretary while the latter was Governor of New York. He was drowned in his early twenties and left no children.

John Clinton was a private in a detachment of levies of the Second New York Regiment of Artillery which was under the command of Colonel Lamb. He received arrears of pay, clothing, and a gratuity due non-commissioned officers and p>privates of the Second Regiment.

[FIRST PAGE HANDWRITTEN AND INSERTED

Wife Sarah mentioned Negro girl named Violet

Goods shipped to son John in Charleston South Carolina

Sons:

Francis Clinton

James

John in Charleston, S.C.

WilliamCharles

Abraham

Daughters:

Ann

Mary

Elizabeth

Jane when of age

Executors:

Walter Goodman of Phila

John Thornhill

Witnesses: Ebenezer Kimmessley Jr.

Administration to:

Sarah Clinton, Charles Williams

Daniel Swan Nov 22, 1764. Executors having rencrinceds(?)

2ND PAGE HANDWRITTEN AND INSERTED

Ref: Bible Records collected in Monongalia Co. West Va. Page 176 DAR Library, Washington D.C. P. 176 Bible Record of Charles Clinton

Original owners Charles and Margaret Clinton. Present owner Marybelle Barrick Westerman, New Martinsville, West Va.

Children of Charles and Margaret Clinton:

Susanna Clinton was borne the 13th day of Feb 1770 at about ten o'clock at night and was married to Daniel Cameron the 6th day of Nov 1788.

John Clinton was born the 24th day of Nov 1771 at half past seven at night and was married to Pressey Leatherberry the 13th day of Oct 1793.

Mary Clinton was born the 13th day of Feb 1774 and was married to Henry Huston the 17th day of Aug. 1794.

William Clinton was born the 7th day of Dec. 1775 about 8 o'clock at night and departed this life the 14th day of April 1778 with the small pox.

Sarah Clinton was born the 11th day of Dec 1777 and departed this life the 9th day of Dec. 1781.

Margaret Clinton was born the 25th day of Dec. 1779 at about 10 o'clock at night and was married to Presley Martin the 6th of Nov 1800.

Your Mother, Margaret Clinton, departed this life the 13th day of Dec. 1793 aged 44 years 2 months and was my wife 24 years two months and ten days.

And on the 21st of June 1795 I was married to Elenor Gapen and on the 8th day of June 1796, Salley (Sarah) Clinton was born at Beescontown (or Buroston) about 11 o'clock morning.

Charles Clinton was born the 2nd of Sept 1797 about five o'clock afternoon.

William Clinton was born the 28th day of Jan 1799

Note: Charles Clinton named a son and daughter by his first wife William and Sarah. They both died. He named a son and daughter by his 2nd wife William and Sarah - for his father and mother.]

John Clinton was a sargeant in Capt. Livingston's Company of the Second Regiment commanded by Col. Willetts.

John Clinton was a private in Capt. John F. Hamtrack's company of the Fifth New York Regiment; he was in the battalion commanded by Col. Louis Duboys. He enlisted May 21, 1779 and was discharged Jan. 1, 1780. In "New York in the Revolutions" a John Clinton is also mentioned as a soldier in the Fourth New York Regiment. The Records are not sufficiently complete to enable one to determine whether one or more of the John Clintons mentioned above may be identified with one or more of the others.

The name Joseph Clinton appears three times as a soldier of New York troops but since the service is not simultaneous, it seems probable that he is the same man. He was first a private in Cap. Benjamin Ledyard's Company of Alexander McDougal's Regiment; he was paid March 1, 1776. He then appears as a private in Capt. Aaronsons's Company of the Third New York Regiment; he had enlisted Dec. 3, 1776 (1775?). The regiment was commanded by Col. Peter Gansevort. He was transferred to Col Willett's command before March 21, 1779. They were in camp near Morristown, N. J., Dec. 12, 1779. He next appears as a private in Capt. George Styte's Company of the First Battalion of the New York forces under command of Co. Goose VanSchaick. He was last paid April 1, 1783. He was unable to write and signed his receipts with his mark "X".

John Clinton was a private in Col. Van Schoonhaven's Regiment of Albany county. He received pay Sept. 3, 1785.

William Clinton was a private in Barnum's Company of Col. John Field's Regiment of Dutchess County Militia.

CONNECTICUT

Allen Clinton was a private in Capt. David Parson's Company of the Second Battalion of Connecticut forces commanded by Col. Zabulon Butler. He was granted a pension and was discharged Jan 25, 1780. He was granted a pension under Act of 1832; he was still on the rolls in 1840 at the age of 77.

The name Joseph Clinton likewise appears three times in the Connecticut Records, and as the record is not simultaneous we may properly regard the record to be that of one man. He was first in Capt. Jonas' Company of the Sixth Connecticut Regiment commanded by Col. Meigs; he enlisted Feb, 26, 1778 and was discharged Aug 6, 1778. He next appears in Capt. Stephen Bett's Company of the Second Connecticut Regiment commanded by Lt. Col. Isaac Sherman. He was transferred to Capt. Icabod Hinkley's Company Dec. 2, 1778; Jan 3, 1779 he was absent without leave, and deserted May 27, 1779; Aug. 1, 1779 he was driving a wagon; he was on a pass from General Hamilton Oct. 30, 1779; he joined Capt. Bett's Company and was furloughed Dec. 14, 1779; he was transferred to Lieut. Halt's Company in October 1780. He next appears as a corporal in Capt. Roger Webb's Company of the Third Regiment commanded by Col. Samuel B. Webb. He received a pension under Act of 1818 at which time he resided in New York.

Levi B. Clinton was a private in Capt. Stephen Bett's Company of the Second Connecticut Regiment commanded by Col. Charles Webb. He enlisted Jan 1, 1777 was taken prisoner Dec. 7 and his death occurred in April 1777; he was recruited from Middlesex County.

In "Connecticut Men of the Revolution" Lawrence Clinton is mentioned as a captain in the Second Regiment of Militia. He is probably the same Lawrence Clinton that married Elizabeth Todd of New Haven, Nov. 15, 1759. He was born Jan 1, 1737 and his father's name was Lawrence.

David Clinton was a private in the Ninth Company of General Wooster's First Connecticut Regiment; he was discharged Nov. 28, 1775. Lewis Clinton was a private in Capt, Matthew Mead's Company of Col. Waterbury's Fifth Connecticut Regiment. They were recruited from Fairfield County.

MASSACHUSETTS

In "Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution" Edward Clinton, Kittery, appears as a private in Capt. John Sharpleigh's Company; the Regiment was stationed at Kittery Point on the sea coast, under the command of Col. Edward Cutt. He served two periods of enlistment; first from July 10, 1775 to Dec. 31, 1775; then from June 9, 1779 to Aug 27, 1779. The second period was in Capt. Spinney's Company of the Second Regiment. His age was 41, complexion light, and he resided at Kittery (New York County, Me) He is undoubtedly the same Clinton mentioned in the census of 1790 as a resident of York County (now in Maine).

The name John Clinton appears in the Massachusetts record five times at least two of which seem to refer to the same man. He was in Capt. Abner Cranson's Company of Col. Asa Whitcomb's Regiment. He received pay Aug. 1, 1775 at Cambridge and again at Prospect (Bunker) Hill Nov. 13, 1775. John Clinton was registered in the same company as from Salem, Mass. and was reported to be serving as a carpenter at Prospect Hill in October 1775. These two were doubtless the same man.

John Clinton, Danvers, was a private in Asa Prince's Company of Col. Danforth Key's Regiment; he enlisted Aug. 15, 1777 and was discharged Jan 3, 1778. He appears to have enlisted again in Capt. Jeramiah's Company of Col. Nathaniel Wade's Regiment July 3, 1778 and was discharged Dec. 1 1778.

John Clinton was a private in Captain Bodwell's Company of Col. Garrish's Regiment of Guards; his service was between April 2, 1778 and July 2, 1778.

John Clinton was a seaman on board the sloop "Republic" commanded by Capt. Foster Williams; he was engaged June 15, 1776 and discharged Nov 18, 1776 at Boston.

NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA

The following data are taken from the North Carolina State Records. The name John Clinton appears three times in volumes 15, 16, and 17. As the service is not simultaneous they may refer to the same man. He enlisted in Capt. Thomas Clark's company April 19, 1776; he is next found to be a sergeant in Reid's Company; he was discharged in October 1778. Among the claims settled by the Commission was one to John Clinton for 50 pounds and 6 shillings.

In a letter, Col. William Purviance writing to the Colonial Council, says that he was reinforced by Capt. Clinton's Company; "Capt. Clinton's minute men are gone down and I make no doubt that with prudence, they will be able to seize the next party that presumes to come on shore, etc." The letter was written from Wilmington. In Vol. 10, Dugall Campbell sends a letter by Major Clinton to Cornelius Hastnet from Samson Hall Aug. 5, 1776.

FIRST PAGE HANDWRITTEN AND INSERTED

Wife Sarah mentioned Negro girl named Violet

Goods shipped to son John in Charleston South Carolina

Sons:

Francis Clinton

James

John in Charleston, S.C.

WilliamCharles

Abraham

Daughters:

Ann

Mary

Elizabeth

Jane when of age

Executors:

Walter Goodman of Phila

John Thornhill

Witnesses: Ebenezer Kimmessley Jr.

Administration to:

Sarah Clinton, Charles Williams

Daniel Swan Nov 22, 1764. Executors having rencrinceds(?)

SECOND PAGE HANDWRITTEN AND INSERTED

Ref: Bible Records collected in Monongalia Co. West Va. Page 176 DAR Library, Washington D.C. P. 176 Bible Record of Charles Clinton

Original owners Charles and Margaret Clinton. Present owner Marybelle Barrick Westerman, New Martinsville, West Va.

Children of Charles and Margaret Clinton:

Susanna Clinton was borne the 13th day of Feb 1770 at about ten o'clock at night and was married to Daniel Cameron the 6th day of Nov 1788.

John Clinton was born the 24th day of Nov 1771 at half past seven at night and was married to Pressey Leatherberry the 13th day of Oct 1793.

Mary Clinton was born the 13th day of Feb 1774 and was married to Henry Huston the 17th day of Aug. 1794. William Clinton was born the 7th day of Dec. 1775 about 8 o'clock at night and departed this life the 14th day of April 1778 with the small pox.

Sarah Clinton was born the 11th day of Dec 1777 and departed this life the 9th day of Dec. 1781.

Margaret Clinton was born the 25th day of Dec. 1779 at about 10 o'clock at night and was married to Presley Martin the 6th of Nov 1800.

Your Mother, Margaret Clinton, departed this life the 13th day of Dec. 1793 aged 44 years 2 months and was my wife 24 years two months and ten days.

And on the 21st of June 1795 I was married to Elenor Gapen and on the 8th day of June 1796, Salley (Sarah) Clinton was born at Beescontown (or Buroston) about 11 o'clock morning.

Charles Clinton was born the 2nd of Sept 1797 about five o'clock afternoon.

William Clinton was born the 28th day of Jan 1799

Note: Charles Clinton named a son and daughter by his first wife William and Sarah. They both died. He named a son and daughter by his 2nd wife William and Sarah - for his father and mother.

Richard Clinton was a member of the North Carolina Assembly (House of Commons) in November 1779. Numerous entries in many volumes appear concerning his services. In November 1779 he joined in a protest against the Confiscation Act. In 1769, a Robert Clinton joined in a request to members of His Majesty's Council to have inspectors (of crops) sent to Orange County, N.C.

In Vol. 8 is the entry that Lord Thomas Pelham-Clinton was elected to the English House of Commons because forty to fifty thousand pounds were spent annually in Westminster by his father the Duke of New- castle.

William Clinton is listed at Charleston, S. C. as a member of Capt. Williams Company of Orange County Militia, Aug. 21, 1776. In May 1775, William Clinton had joined in a petition to His Majesty's Council to confirm their title to land which had been transferred to South Carolina by a change of boundary between the two provinces.

In vol. 16, Clinton appears as the name of a town in Sampson County, N. C.

In Vol. 23, it is stated that Peter Clinton was named a Justice of the Peace Dec. 23, 1778 by the Assembly of North Carolina.

In "Old Records of the War Department" Nathaniel Clinton appears as a soldier of the Fifth South Carolina Regiment. He enlisted Feb. 23, 1778.

MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS

Sir Henry Clinton, son of George Clinton, a former Royal Governor of New York, succeeded General Howe in command of the British forces in America. After the war was over, he and Cornwallis engaged in a bitter controversy as to the course of their defeat. He returned to England in 1782 and in 1795 was made Governor of Gibraltar. His son, Sir Henry, became a general on Wellington's staff in the Peninsula Campaign in the Napoleonic wars in Europe. He seemed to have owned property in America at the outbreak of the Revolution. In the supplement to "New York in the Revolution" it is stated that he forfeited his estate to New York in 1788.

In Vol. 30, Page 58 of the New England Register is found a letter written by Col. Ethan Allen dated April 4, 1781 and addressed to His Excellency Henry F. Clinton, Governor of New York. He refers to his dismissal from the Vermont Service and applies for service in New York. The very strange thing about this letter is that George Clinton was Governor of New York at this time. There is no other historical reference to this Henry F. Clinton. It is strange that Col. Ethan Allen was uninformed on this point.

In Vol 19 of the New England Register is found the death notice of Henry Pelham-Clinton, Fifth Duke of Cumberland. He is mentioned as a descendant in the eighth generation from Edward Clinton, a younger brother of Thomas, Third Earl of Lincoln whose family was so intimately associated with the Massaschsetts Colony. Thomas Dudley, one of the early Governors having been Steward to his son Theophilus, Fourth Earl of Lincoln and two daughters Arabella and Susan having emigrated to New England with their husbands. Arabella was Mrs. Isaac Johnson and Susan was Mrs. John Humphries.

Henry Clinton, Ninth Earl of Lincoln, who added the surname Pelham, succeeded the uncle of this Countess (Pelham was also his own uncle, the brother of his mother) as the Second Duke of Newcastle and the tenth Earl of Lincoln. Henry Pelham-Clinton was the Fourth Duke of Newcastle and the father of the deceased. The said Fifth Duke of Cumberland succeeded to the title Jan 12, 1857. He visited America in 1860 in company with the Prince of Wales. He was the eldest of six sons of Henry, the Fourth Duke, by his wife Georgiana Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Miller Mundy, M.P. of Shipley-Hall, Derbyshire. He was born May 12, 1811 and was educated at Eaton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he took the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1832.

In Vol. 21, of the New England Register it is reported that Judge Dewey married Carolina Hannah Clinton at Newbury, N.Y. July 28, 1824. She died May 21, 1844. Their children were:

John Clinton Dewey, born Nov. 25, 1825 and died Dec. 23, 1852.

Caroline Betts Dewey born March 26, 1827. She became Mrs. David Webb Alvord of Greenfield, Mass.

Charles Augustus Dewey born Dec. 29, 1830.

Mary Clinton Dewey born Nov. 5, 1832

Edward James Dewey born Nov. 5, 1832 (twins?). He died May 4, 1836

Henry Clinton Dewey born Dec. 8, 1834, died April 10, 1836

Mary Noble Dewey born Sept. 15, 1837

George Clinton Dewey born Sept. 6, 1840, died April 16, 1864

In the Vital Records of Ipswick, Mass, we find the following:

James Clinton married Mary Patch Dec. 28, 1769.

Lawrence Clinton married Rachael Hatfield in December 1665.

Lucy Clinton and Edward Clark were married Jan 11, 1764.

Mary Clinton and Humphry Clark were married Jan 26, 1809.

Samuel Clinton and Jemina Parsons were married July 10, 1779

Sarah Clinton and Ephrium Harris were married Aug. 2, 1791

John Clinton, Salem, married Ann Bennett, Beverly, Nov. 1, 1774

The births at Ipswick were as follows:

David Clinton, Nov. 8, 1794

Eboneser Clinton Dec. 6, 1776

Jacob Clinton Dec. 20, 1705

James Clinton April 15, 1744

James Clinton Aug. 12, 1772

Jonathan Clinton Jan 28, 1706

Merey Clinton March 3, 1782

Susan Clinton Sept 22, 1770

Elizabeth Clinton May 19, 1734

Elijah Clinton April 17, 1737

Samuel Clinton Nov. 1, 1741

In the Vital Records of New Haven, Conn. we find the following:

Mary Clinton and Isaac Griggs were married Oct. 1, 1725

Elizabeth Clinton and James Bishop were married jan. 20, 1726

George Clinton and Ann Hodges were married Nov. 8, 1737

Elizabeth Clinton and Elephalet Stephens were married June-1737

Lawrence Clinton and Elizabeth Todd were married Nov. 15, 1759

George Clinton and Ann Clark were married May 24, 1733

Thomas Clinton and Hope Dows were married Aug. 7, 1718

John Clinton and Ann Thorp were married June 7, 1764

Thomas Clinton and Martha Stearns were married Aug. 10, 1743

The following births were recorded at New Haven:

Ann, daughter of John Clinton April 9, 1766

David, son of Lawrence Clinton Aug. 27, 1765

Ebeneser, son of Thomas Clinton Feb. 20, 1775

Elphas, son of Joseph Clinton July 17, 1739

Esther, daughter of Joseph Clinton April 27, 1732

Esther, daughter of Lawrence Clinton Aug. 6, 1760

Eunice, daughter of Lawrence and Elizabeth Clinton Dec. 15, 1768

Lawrence, son of Lawrence Clinton Jan. 1, 1737

Obedience, daughter of George Clinton March 25, 1734

Jesse, son of Lawrence and Elizabeth Clinton Aug. 9, 1762

John, son of Thomas Clinton Nov. 8, 1721

John, son of Lawrence Clinton April 9, 1740

Joseph Clinton Sept 10, 1735

Sibyl daughter of Joseph Clinton April 21, 1729

Thomas, son of Ebeneser and Lois Clinton Feb. 8, 1779

Thomas, son of Thomas Clinton May 13, 1750

Thomas, son of Thomas Clinton June 29, 1719

William, son of Joseph Clinton May 15, 1726

Thomas Clinton died Dec. 26, 1759

THE UNITED STATES CENSUS RECORD

There is ample evidence that the early censuses were very incomplete. The census for 1790 for ten states was published in book form. Of the Clintons there were a total of 31 heads of families containing in all 150 persons. It is our plan to infer connections of these with the earlier records where this seems logical, and to trace the family in a given county as far as possible through the later censuses. It will be seen that there is very meager information given about each family; only the head is named and the number of persons in each family between certain ages are given. In 1790 the numbers given were exclusive of the head of the family; in the later censuses the head of the family was included in the numbers given.

NEW YORK

Charles Clinton (1730-1791), Montgomery Township, Ulster County. He had no family but he had one slave. He was the older brother of General James Clinton, the same as he who served as Surveyor General of New York up to 1781. He was a practicing physician, and served the English Army in Havana during the French and Indian War. His ledger and daybook have been preserved and contain much interesting information concerning his practice.

James Clinton, New Windsor Township, Ulster County. In 1790 there were in his family six females, and three males over 16. This was undoubtedly General James Clinton who died in 1812. New Windsor Township had become a part of Orange County in 1800. At that time this family consisted of one male over 45, one female 26 to 45, one female 16-26, one male 10-16, one female 10-16, three females under 10 and four slaves.

George Clinton, East Ward, New York City. In 1790 there were in this family seven females, one male under 16, two white servants, and eight slaves. This was the revolutionary Governor of New York; he also died in 1812.

John Clinton, Ballston Township, Albany County. In 1790 there were in this family one female, and two males over 16. He as probably the private soldier who joined Col. VanSchoonhaven's Regiment at Albany. John Clinton Jr. lived in the same township. In 1790 there were in his family two females and three males under 16. We find both of these families in 1800, but then they lived in Watervliet Township. At that time the elder Clinton and his wife were both over 45; they had one son living at home between 16 and 26. The younger John Clinton and his wife were both 26-45; at home there was one female under 10. There are no entries for these families for 1810, but in 1820 a John Clinton again resided in Watervliet Township; his family was then made up of one male over 45, one female 26-45, two males under 10, and one female under 10. this appears to have been the family of the "Junior" mentioned above.

Joseph Clinton, Watervliet Township, Albany County. In 1790 this family consisted of three females and two males under 14. He was probably of the same family as John Jr. His name does not appear at the same place in later censuses.

Joseph Clinton, Rawlins Township, Dutchese County. In 1790 there was one female in his family. He was probably the soldier who served in Col. Peter Ganservert's Regiment which was recruited in that neighborhood. In 1800 his family consisted of one male 26-45, one female 26-45, and four females under 10. What may have been the same family with notable changes is to be accounted for by deaths and another marriage is recorded in 1810 thus: one male over 45, one female 16-26 and two males under 10.

Simeon Clinton, also of Rawlins township, appears in the census record of 1800, 1810, and 1820. His residence suggests some relationship to Joseph Clinton. In 1810, the family was one male 26-45, one female 26-45, two males under 10, one female 10-16, and one female under 10. In 1820, this family consisted of one male over 45, one female over 45, one male 10-16, one female 16-26, and one female under 10.

William Clinton, a soldier in Col. John Field's Regiment of Militia, which was recruited in Dutchese County is not found in the census record. He was probably a near relative of Joseph or Simeon.

CONNECTICUT

Allan Clinton, Stamford Town, Fairfield County. In 1790 his family consisted of two females. He is probably the soldier who served under Col. Zebulon Butler during the Revolution. Although his name does not again appear in the census record of Fairfield county, the pension records show that he was granted a pension under Act. of June 7, 1832. He was still on the rolls in 1840 when his age was given as 77; he was therefore born in 1765.

Joseph Clinton, Stamford Town, Fairfield County. In 1790 his family consisted of one female and two males over 16. If he was the soldier who served in the Third Connecticut Regiment under Col. Samuel B. Webb, he was granted a pension under the Act of 1818 at which time he resided in New York.

Henry Clinton, Litchfield Town and County. In 1800 this family consisted of one male over 45, one female over 45, one female 26-45, one female 10-26, one female under 10, and one male under 10. In 1790 there had been three females and one male under 16.

Truman Clinton, Litchfield Town. In 1800 his family was made up of one male under 26, one female under 26 and two females under 10.

Lyman Clinton, Litchfield Town. In 1800 his family was made up of one male 26-45, one female 26-45, and one male under 10. In 1803 a Lyman Clinton bought land in Newark Valley, Tiege County NY Vol. 54 of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Records.

Jesse Clinton, Litchfield Town. In 1800 his family was one male 26-45, one female 26-45, one female under 10 and another male 26-45.

Ebeneser Clinton, Derby Town, New Haven County. In 1790 there were one female and two males under 16 in his family. According to the Vital Records he was the son of Thomas and Martha Clinton and was born Feb. 20, 1755.

Jesse Clinton, Wallingford Town, New Haven County. In 1790 his family consisted of two females and one male under 16. In 1800 there were one male 26-45, one female 26-45, two males 10-16, one female 10-16, and three females under 10. He was the son of Lawrence and Elizabeth Clinton and was born Aug. 9, 1762.

Lawrence Clinton, New Haven Town and County. In 1790 there were two females and one male under 16. Another Lawrence Clinton is reported in Woodridge Town of New Haven County in whose family there were two females in 1790. It is impossible to distinguish between the two in the census record; one of them was the husband of Elizabeth Todd and the father of several sons. Attention is called to the part played by a Lawrence Clinton in King Phillips War. This Lawrence could have been a grandson or great grandson of that Lawrence.

Samuel Clinton, Woodridge Town, New Haven County. In 1790 there were in his family two females and four males under 16. In 1800 this family appears to have lived in Wolcott Town of the same county. Then there were one male over 45, one female 26-45, one female 10-26, one female under 10, two males 10-26, and two males under 10. the age of this man coincides with that of Samuel Clinton born to Abigail and Lawrence Clinton in July 1754. They, however, lived at Northup N.Y.

Anson Clinton Woodridge Town, New Haven County had no family in 1790.

Edward Clinton, Derby Town, New Haven County. In 1800 his family consisted of one male over 45, one female 26-45, two males under 10, and two females under 10.

Thomas Clinton, Woodridge Town, New Haven County. In 1800 his family consisted of one male 16-26, one female 16-26 and one male under 10.

William Clinton, Wolcott Town, New Haven County. In 1800 his family consisted of one male 16-26, one female 16-26 and one male under 10.

John Clinton, Wolcott Town, New Haven County. In 1800 his family consisted of one male 26-45, one female 26-45, and one male and two females under 10.

MASSACHUSETTS

Rev. Isaac Clinton, Southwick Town Hampshire County. In 1790 his family consisted of one female and three males under 16. The records of the census in Massachusetts for 1800 were temporarily unavailable. This family does not appear in the census for 1810.

James Clinton, Ipswick Town, Essex County. In 1790 there were three females, and one male under 16. In 1810 this name again appears; there were one male and one female 16-26 and three females 10-16. This could not have been the same James as the one in the 1790 records; he was probably a son. A James Clinton (the son?) was born Aug 12, 1772. The father was born April 5, 1744. James Clinton and Martha Patch were married Dec. 25, 1769.

John Clinton, Danvers Town, Essex County. In 1790, there were three females and one male under 16. At this place in 1810, there is the name of Betsy Clinton, and in her family there were two females over 45, one of them may have been the widow of John Clinton.

John Clinton, Boston, Suffick(?) County. In 1790 there were three females. In 1800 Edward Clinton lived at Kittery; there were in his family one male over 45, one female over 45 one female 26-45, one female 10-16. Here is confirmatory evidence that the Edward Clinton in Col. Cutt's Massachusetts Regiment was the same as the name in the 1790 census. No Clinton appears in the census of 1810 at this place.

NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA

Agnes Clinton, Laurens County S.C. In 1790 there were three females and two males under 16, and two males over 16. In this place in 1810 appears the name of Robert Ham Clinton. In his family there were one male over 45, one female 26-45, one female 10-16, and one male under 10.

Ephrium Clinton, Camden District, Lancaster County, S.C. In 1790 there were in his family two females and two males over 16, and seven males under 16. No Clinton appears in the Census of 1810 at this place.

Note - the census records of North Carolina were temporarily unavailable for 1810.

Edward Clinton, Salisbury District, Surry County N.C. In this family in 1790 there were four females and two males over 16 and three females under 16.

In the same District in 1800 we find the name Edward Clanton, undoubtedly a corruption of Clinton; in his family there were one male and one female 26-45 and one male under 10. There appeared also Edward Clanton Sr. in whose family there were one male over 45, one female 26-45, two males 10-14 one male 16-26, two females under 10, one female 10-16, and one female 16-26. There was also Thomas Clanton at the same place in whose family there were one male and one female 26-45, and one male under 10. At this place we also find Benjamin Clanton in whose family there were one male over 45, one female over 45, and one female 10-14.

In this District also we find Charles Clanton in whose family there were one male and one female over 45, two males 10-16, two males under 10, one female 10-16 and one female under 10. On another page of the record the names of Edward and Benjamin Clanton were reported with almost the same members as above; it appears to have be a repetition.

PENNSYLVANIA AND OHIO

[HANDWRITTEN PAGE INSERTED AS FOLLOWS;

See Bible record inserted at P.12. This is all wrong here for these. Thos was not his son. Chas was born Sept 1797. He had no son. Joshua]

Although the name Clinton appears more than forty times in Pennsylvania Archives and early records, it is found only twice in the United States census report of 1790 for that state.

Charles Clinton, Union Township, Fayette County Pa. In 1790 there were three females and two males over 16.

One of three females was doubtless his wife. Considering the later records of this family, it seems fair to infer that one of the boys over 16 was Charles C. Clinton. Thomas and his family had stayed at Cumberland; John was also married and had a family of his own. There were a considerable number of land transactions in Fayette County by Charles Clinton, the first of these was in 1784. In this deed, (one of the first twenty to be recorded in Fayette County) he gave Washington County, Md as his residence. This, of course, identifies him as the Capt. Charles Clinton who received his commission from the Maryland Council of Safety in 1776. He sold a part of his holdings in Fayette County in 1802, and in the deed gave Greene County, Pa as his residence. This identifies him as the Charles Clinton reported in that County in the 1800 census. At that time his family consisted of two males under 10, one female under 10, one female 10-16, and one male under 26; one of the younger boys may have been Joshua Clinton who married Maria Abraham at Carrollton, OH. Nov 7, 1835. Charles' own age and that of his wife are given as "over 45". He must have been born before 1740. His name does not appear in the later censuses.(Circumstantial evidence suggests this Clinton family is the family of our Margaret Clinton. jm)

In 1929 the sexton of the Uniontown cemetery gave the information that he had attended a school near Laurel Hill Church which was known as the Clinton School; more recently it has been known as the "White School", a brick building is still there but it has fallen into disuse. This is in the neighborhood where Charles Clinton had acquired several tracts of land, and also where John Clinton lived in 1800.

Ann Clinton, Philadelphia, Pa. In 1790 there were four families, three males over and two under 16. She seems to have been the widow of John Clinton, a revolutionary soldier who obtained a license to marry Ann Finey Nov. 15, 1775. No attempt has been made to trace this family in the later censuses.

John Clinton, Union Township, Fayette County, Pa. In 1800 this family consisted of one male over 45, one female 26-45, three males under 10 and two females 10-16. Considering the later record of this family, the two daughters 10-16 must have been Margaret (Mrs. VanTilburg) and Priscilla (Mrs. Crabb) the three sons under 10 must have been Abel, Thomas, and John, the last was born in 1798. This family does not appear in the census of 1810. They however, appear as residents of Columbiana County, OH, in the Census of 1820; at that time the family consisted of one male over 45, one female over 45, one male (John Jr.) 16-26, two males (Edward and William) 10-16, one male (Dewitt) under 10, one female 16-26 and one 10-16. The elder daughters, Able and Thomas were already married and lived in separate houses, some of them in Jefferson County, OH. In 1830 this family consisted of one male 50-60 and one female 50-60 (these ages are not in agreement with those given in 1800), two males (Edward and William) 20-30, one male (Dewitt) 15-20, one male (probably Peter a grandson) 5-10, and one female (Nancy) 15-20. This John Clinton died in 1838, and his estate was settled four years later; he had obtained a patent from the Federal Government for one-fourth of Sec. 23, T 14 R S, on Jan 22, 1816. He resided in Jefferson County at the time final payment was made Dec. 27, 1819. This record is found in the land office at Washington D.C. Attention is called to the military record of this John Clinton, Page 11.

Able Clinton, whose name does not appear in the census record, died in 1829(?) leaving two heirs, Peter aged 4, and Priscilla aged 2. When John's estate was settled in 1842, these children also appear as his heirs.

Thomas Clinton, Knox Township, Jefferson county. In 1820, his family consisted of one male 16-26 one female 16-26, one male (Jacob) under 10, and one female (Margaret) under 10. Thomas Clinton was deceased in 1842 when John Clinton's estate was settled; his heirs appear as interested parties in the settlement of that estate.

John Clinton, Jr. (son of the John whose record has just been discussed) Washington Township, Carroll County, OH. In 1830 his family consisted of one male 30-40, one female 20-30, two males (Charles W and William James) under 5, one female (Thankful) 5-10, one female Priscilla under 5. In 1840 this family was composed of one male 40-50, one female 30-40, two males (Charles and William) 10-15, one male (Francis) under 5, one female (Thankful) 15-20, one female (Priscilla) 10-15, and two females (Phoebe and Libbie) 5-10. In 1844 this family migrated to Jefferson County, IA, going by boat via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.

Edward Clinton, Washington Township, Carroll County, OH. In 1840 there were in this family one male 30-40, one male 10-15, one female 5-10, and two females under 5. There was no adult female in the record; he, however, married Hester Baxter Oct. 28, 1841. This family does not appear in the next two census records.

Widow Clinton (First), Washington Township, Carroll County. In the census of 1830 there were one female (the widow) 20-30, one female under 5, and one male under 5. This doubtless was Eva Clinton, the widow of Abel.

Widow Clinton (Second) Washington Township, Carroll County. In 1830 her family consisted of one female 20-30, one female 10-15, one female under 5 and one male 5-10. Thomas Clinton was doubtless the deceased husband of this widow. It would appear that the two older children Jacob and Margaret did not live at home at this time. The later censuses do not mention the families of these widows.

William Clinton, Augusta Township, Carroll County, OH. In 1840 his family consisted of one male 30-40, one female 20-30, one female 5-10, two females under 5, and one male 5-10. In 1850 his family was listed as follows: William Clinton, Blacksmith, 55(?), Catherine Clinton 47 (?), John Clinton, blacksmith 18, Margaret 16, Priscilla 12, Clarissa 8, Daniel 5, Melville 3, and Hurlbut 4 months. In 1850 this family was listed as follows: William Clinton 56, born in Ohio, Catherine Clinton 45, born in Maryland, Matilda 19, Clarissa 18, Daniel 15, Melville 13, William H. (Hurlbut) 10, and Mary E. &. In 1870 this family had dwindled to Clinton Estate (F) 56, James M. 22, William H. 20, and Mary E. 17. The heirs of William Clinton finally deeded away their interests in the home at Augusta in 1878. Mary resided in Cleveland, James M. in Minerva, and most of the others at Delray, Carroll County.

In 1800 the Clinton name appears but once in Carroll County. Hester Clinton 62(?) and her mother was born in Ohio, but her father was born in Maryland; she was the widow of Edward Clinton.

John Clinton, Fox Township, Carroll County, OH In 1850 his family consisted of John Clinton 29, Elisa 24, Nancy 8, Thomas 6, Catherine 5 and Sarah 3 months. He was doubtless the son of Thomas Clinton after his father's death he appeared as an heir in the settlement of his grandfather's (John's) estate in 1842. In 1860 only Nancy of this family remained, and she resided in the home of Heaton Johnson. Samantha Clinton 12 and Thomas J. Clinton 4 lived in East Township of Carroll county in 1850; they lived in the home of Sutton Cunningham.

GENEALOGY OF THE CLINTON FAMILY FROM THE EARLIEST RECORDS

The Roman numerals are used to number the generations. When lateral lines are taken up, these numerals will indicate the relationship to the original line.

I. William de Ville Tancredi, chamberlain to William the Conqueror. His wife was Maud, daughter of William de Arches

1. Osbert

2. Renebald

3. William

These three sons all accompanied the Conqueror in his victorious march into England A.D. 1066, and were rewarded by him with large possessions. They received the manors of Kenilworth, Colehill, and Maxtoke in Warwickshire, and the manor of Glimpton in Oxfordshire, Osbert, the oldest son was named de Tankerville. His son and heir was William de Tankerville.

II. Renebald, second son of William de Tancredi, received from the Conqueror, the lordship of Clinton in Oxfordshire, and he acquired his surname from this place.

1. Goeffrey

2. Osbert

3 William

Goeffrey was so high in the favor of King Henry I that the king bestowed upon him great honors and possessions. He was made both Lord Chamberlain and Treasurer to the King. He was later promoted to the great office of Justice of England. He built the strong castle of Kenilworth in Warwickshire; near by he founded a monastery for Black Cannons. His line terminated with the death of his grandson Henry de Clinton.

III. Osbert de Clinton second son of Renebald inherited a part of the Clinton estate

1. Osbert de Clinton

2. Roger de Clinton who became Bishop of Coventry in 1148

Hugh de Clinton

Maurice de Clinton

Osbert de Clinton inherited the principal estate of Clinton from his uncle Goeffrey; he was granted the lordship of Colehill. He wife's name was Margaret, daughter of William de Hutton

1. Osbert de Clinton

Osbert de Clinton inherited Amington in Warwickshire from his mother. He succeeded to the estate of Clinton in 1207. He joined the rebellious barons against King John and forfeited his estates. He made his peace with King Henry III and his possessions were restored to him. He died in 1225.

1. Thomas Clinton

VI. Thomas Clinton became Justice of the Assize in County of Warwick. His wife was Hasera, daughter of James of Bisege.

1. Thomas Clinton

2. John Clinton of Colehill, his line expired in 1553 (?)

3. Osbert Clinton who had no issue.

4. William Clinton who became rector of the Church of Autrey.

5. James Clinton who inherited Basley from his mother. the estate became known as Basley-Clinton

VII. Thomas Clinton married Maud, daughter of Sir Ralph Bracebridge.

1. John Clinton

VIII John Clinton; Feb 6, 1298 he was summoned to parliament as Baron Clinton of Maxtook; in 1301 he accompanied Edward on an expedition to Scotland. He married Ida, the daughter of Sir William Oldingsolld. After her husband's death, she attended Queen Isabel, wife of King Edward, on an expedition to France.

1. John Clinton

2. William Clinton "whose great actions and eminent employments do so sufficiently manifest his great abilities that he may well be reputed one of the chiefest worthies of the Kingdom. He was made Governor of Dover Castle, and Warden of Cinque Forest. These honors were bestowed because of his distinguished service in the wars in Scotland waged by Edward III. He was created Earl of Huntington on March 16, 1337.

IX John Clinton, second Lord Clinton, was summoned to Parliament as a baron of the realm. His wife was Margaret, daughter of Sir William Corbet.

1. John Clinton 1326-1399

2. Mary Clinton wife of Baldwin de Montfort de Colehill.

X. John Clinton, third Lord Clinton was knighted in 1354 for his service in the war in Scotland under command of his uncle, the Earl of Huntington. He was in the battle of Poietiers in which the French king was taken prisoner. He married Idonea, daughter of Jeffry Lord Say, who became heir to that estate.

1. Catherine, wife of Thomas Lord Berkley

2. William Clinton

3. Thomas Clinton who served under John of Gaunt in Spain and Portugal.

4. Edward Clinton who died unmarried in 1400

XI William Clinton who married Elizabeth, daughter of sir William Doincourt.

1. William Clinton

2. Richard Clinton

XII William Clinton, fourth Lord Clinton was with Henry IV when the English army burned a part of Edenburg and Leith. He was with the Earl of Sumerset in the army which defended Calais. He was at the siege and capture of Caen in Normandy. He inherited the title of Lord Say from his grandmother, Idonea in the fifth year of Henry V. He died July 30, 1452. His wife was Anne, daughter of William, Earl of Botraux

1. John Clinton

XIII John Clinton, fifth Lord Clinton while in the service of Richard, Duke of York was taken prisoner and was not released for six years. He paid six hundred sacks of woollen cloths as a ransom. In 1459, he fought for the House of York against the king; for this he lost his estates; he later regained them in the reign of Edward IV. He accompanied Edward in the siege of Bamberg and other strongholds which were held by the Lancastrian Prince. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Fynes

1. John Clinton

XIV John Clinton, sixth Lord Clinton, married Ann, daughter of Sir Humphry Stafford; he died Feb 29, 1488

1. John Clinton

XV John Clinton, seventh Lord Clinton, accompanied the Duke of Suffolk with a force that occupied Calais in 1514. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Morgan of Tredegar

1. Thomas Clinton

XVI Thomas Clinton, eighth Lord Clinton was 24 years of age at the death of his father and succeeded to the manor of Folkstone. He died Aug. 7, 1517 of an epidemic known as the "sweating sickness". He had married Mary, natural daughter of Sir Edward Poynings. On (legal) inquiry at his death, a jury found that he died possessed of the manors of Balshall, Shustoke(?), Pakinton, Amington Parva, Amington Magna, Perlcroft, and Austre in Warwickshire. Beside the forgoing his son Edward obtained the manors of Folkstone, Clinton Huntington, Bemstead, Ruthinmarth, and also lands in Wigham, Wodensburg, and Ashe near Sandwich.

1. Edward Clinton

XVII Edward Clinton, Ninth Lord Clinton and First Earl of Lincoln 1512-1586. Being an orphan of the nobility he became a ward of King Henry VIII, "who took such good care of his education that he became wise, valiant, and fortunate in all his enterprises."

In 1532 he attended Henry VIII in his visit to Francis I, King of France. He was with the fleet sent against Scotland. He was in command of Bologne while the French besieged it in 1549. May 14, 1550 he became Lord High Admiral of England and held this position under Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth. He was present at the marriage of Queen Mary to Phillip of Spain. In 1557 he was second in command to Earl of Pembroke of an army which besieged St. Quintin. Elizabeth reappointed him Lord High Admiral. He was advanced to the title of Earl of Lincoln May 4, 1572. He was one of the commissioners to treat for the marriage of the queen to the Duke of Anjeu.

The author of the Newcastle genealogy says, "he was in the age in which he lived, one of the most eminent persons this nation has produced." He devotes one-half of the genealogy to a discussion of the services, honors, and achievements of this one man. Edward seems to have achieved the unique feat of always standing in good favor with the reining monarch, even though the changes from Edward to Mary, and from Mary to Elizabeth were little less than political somersaults. He undoubtedly subscribed to the doctrine that the king can do no wrong.

Notwithstanding the great possessions which he inherited, he was granted at various times by the sovereign a large part of the estates of the nobility who lost their property or their heads because of their political activities. In his day he must have been one of the very richest men in England. He was married three times; Ursula, the mother of his heirs, was the daughter of William Lord Sourton

1. Henry Clinton

2. Thomas Clinton

3. Anne Clinton

4. Frances Clinton

XVIII Henry Clinton, the second Earl of Lincoln ____ 1616, accompanied his father on his embassy to the French Court, was one of the commissioners who tried Mary Queen of Scotts, and became a member of the Privy Council. He first married Catherine, daughter of Francis Hastings, Earl of Huntington; their children were:

1. Thomas Clinton

2. Edward Clinton

His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Richard Morrison, heir of Lord Norreys of Rycote; their children were:

1. Henry Clinton

2. Robert Clinton

3. Elizabeth Clinton

XIX Thomas Clinton, third Earl of Lincoln, represented St. Ives of Cornwall in parliament before he obtained his title of Earl. He served on the commission which negotiated the union of England and Scotland. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Henry Knevitt of Charlton. Their children were:

1. Henry Clinton, died young

2. Thomas Clinton, died young

3. Theophilus Clinton

4. Edward Clinton

5. Charles Clinton

6. Knevitt Clinton

7. Robert Clinton, died young.

His daughters were Catherine, Lucy, Anne, Dorcas Elizabeth, Frances, Susan, Arabella, and Sarah. Susan (Mrs. Humphries) and Arabella (Mrs. Isaac Johnson) migrated to Massachusetts with their husbands.

XX Theophilus Clinton, fourth Earl of Lincoln, served as a colonel in the army of the Elector of the Palatinate. In 1647 he espoused the cause of King Charles I, and for this he was tried by parliament for high treason; he was later pardoned. When Charles II was crowned, he served as the carver. He first married Bridget, daughter of William Fiennes, Viscount of Say and Sele. Their children were:

1. Edward Clinton

2. George Clinton, died young

3. Catherine, who married Lord Delaware

4. Bridget, died unmarried

5. Lucy, died unmarried

6. Arrabella, who married Rolle of Hainten-Sackville

7. Margaret, who married Hugh Boscavan

8. Mary, died young

9 Judith

He later married Elizabeth, daughter of Arthur George; they had no children.

XXI Edward Clinton, died before his father. He had married Anne, daughter of John Holles, Earl of Clare; they had one son.

1. Edward Clinton

XXII Edward Clinton, fifth Earl of Lincoln, succeeded to the title by inheritance from his grandfather. He was made Knight of the Bath at the coronation of Charles II. He married Jane, daughter of Peter of Guliere, Lord of Verune in France. Edward died without issue.

XIX Edward Clinton was the second son of Henry, the second Earl of Lincoln. His first wife was Mary, the daughter of Thomas Dighton. Their children were:

1. Charles Clinton, died young

2. Robert Clinton, left no issue

3. Francis Clinton

4. Catherine, who became the wife of Thomas Seville of Newton.

By his second wife, Elizabeth, he had the following children:

1. Henry Clinton

2. Robert Clinton

3. Elizabeth, who married Sir Arthur Gorges

XX Francis Clinton married Priscilla, daughter of John Hill

1. Francis Clinton

2. Thomas Clinton

3. Priscilla who married Sir Willoughby Ewes

XXI Francis Clinton, sixth Earl of Lincoln, married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Kiligrew. They had one son:

1. Francis Clinton, who died in infancy

His second wife was Susan, daughter of Anthony Penniston. Their children were:

1. Henry Clinton

2. George Clinton

3. Susannah, who married the Hon. Robert Booth

XXII George Clinton, third son of the sixth Earl of Lincoln, became a captain in the Royal Navy. He served as Royal Governor of the New York Colony from 1745 to 1755. He died in 1761.

1. Mary, who died and was buried in New York.

2. Henry Clinton, who commanded the British Army in the American Revolution

XXII Henry Clinton,seventh Earl of Lincoln, 1684-1728 was the second son of Francis, the sixth Earl of Lincoln. He opposed the Treaty of Utrecht, became Paymaster General of His Majesty's (George I) forces; He became Knight of the Garter March 27, 1721, and a member of the Privy-Council. He married Lucy, daughter of Lord Pelham, Duke of Newcastle. Their children were:

1. George Clinton

2. Henry Clinton

3. Thomas Clinton

They had four daughters all of whom died unmarried.

XXIII George Clinton, eighth Earl of Lincoln, succeeded to the title but died at 13 years of age.

XXIII Henry Pelham-Clinton (1720-1778), ninth Earl of Lincoln, was the first of his family to become Duke of Newcastle; April 1, 1751 he was appointed Auditor of receipts of His Majesty's Exchequer. He became a fellow of the Royal Society and a Doctor of Laws. He married Catherine, daughter and co-heir of the Right Honorable Henry Pelham, brother of the former Duke of Newcastle. Their children were:

1. George Clinton (1745-1752)

2. Henry Fienes Pelham-Clinton

His second wife was Frances Seymour Conway, daughter of the Earl of Herford. Their children were:

1. Catherine

2. Thomas Pelham-Clinton, became member of parliament

3. John Pelham-Clinton, who was also a member of parliament

XIX Henry Clinton, son of the second Earl of Lincoln, married Eleanor, daughter of Sir James Harrington. Their children were:

1. Henry Clinton

2. Harrington Clinton

3. Norreys Clinton

He later married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Hickman whose brother Walter was the ancestor of the Earl of Plymouth. Their children were:

1. Arthur Clinton

2. William Clinton

Norreys Fynes Clinton was condemned to death for his service to King Charles I, but while negotiations were going on with the hope of affecting his exchange for a prisoner on the other side, the religious service being conducted for his consolation was prolonged by psalm singing; meantime arrangement for the exchange had been concluded and a messenger bearing the news arrived just in time to save his life. This story is related by Dr. N. Fynes Clinton.

1. Norreys Clinton

2. Henry Clinton, died young

3. Charles Clinton

4. Edward Clinton, died young

XXIII Dr. Fynes Clinton was the great grandson of Norreys Fynes Clinton, who was the grandson of the second Earl of Lincoln.

1. Henry Fynes Clinton

XXIV Henry Fynes Clinton (1781-1852) was a celebrated author of books on genealogy of ancient Greeks, Romans and Biblical characters. He also served in parliament for many years.

1. Charles John Fynes Clinton (1799-1872), was the editor of the autobiography of his father from which this information was obtained.

With the exception of the facts concerning the descendants of Norreys Clinton, all of the foregoing is an abstract of the genealogy of the Duke of Newcastle, printed about 1780. The authors name does not appear, but he was someone very close to the Duke.

XX William Clinton, probably the William Clinton who was the fifth son of Henry the son of the second Earl of Lincoln; if so his mother's name was Elizabeth Hickman before her marriage. He was an officer in the army of King Charles I, and for this he was banished to the continent; he later went to Scotland where he married a Scotch lady named Kennedy; they later moved to Ireland. He died when his only son was two years old.

1. James Clinton

XXI James Clinton is his early manhood went to England to demand the restoration of his father's estate; these had been confiscated by the Commonwealth under Cormwell; Charles II refused to honor his claim. He soon after married the daughter of Captain Smith one of Cormwell's officers.

1. Charles Clinton

XXII Charles Clinton (1690-1773) chartered the ship "George and Anne and paid the passage of ninety four persons to America in 1729. They landed at Cape Cod in the same year. He moved to New York in 1731 and founded Little Britain in Ulster, now Orange County. He served as Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, Surveyor General of the Colony, and Colonel of militia

1. Alexander Clinton (1732-1757) became a doctor; he had no family.

[HANDWRITTEN PAGE INSERTED AT THIS POINT:

*James Clinton had six other children by his second wife, Mary Little Gray, who was born August 22, 1768 and died on June 23, 1835 at Newburgh, New York. They were:

1. James who died young

2. Emma L. born Feb 1802, died July 6, 1823

3. Caroline H. born Mar 27, 1800

4. James Graham born Jan 2, 1804

5. Letitia born April 12, 1806

6. Anna Born July 26, 1809

Per: Gloria Tregurtha 6607 Kensal Ct. Springfield, VA]

2. Charles Clinton (1731-1791) was a doctor in the British army during the French and Indian wars. He died without issue.

3. James Clinton (1736-1812)

4. George Clinton (1739-1812)

XXIII*James Clinton was an officer in the British army during the French and Indian War and became a Major General in the American Army during the Revolution.

1. Alexander Clinton was a Lieutenant in the American Army during the Revolution, served as private secretary to his Uncle George, the Governor of New York; he was drowned in his early twenties.

2. Charles Clinton (1767-1829)

3. DeWitt Clinton (1769-1828)

4. George Clinton (1771-_______)

XXIII George Clinton, the youngest son of Charles, the founder of the family in America, was the first Governor of the State of New York and served as such for seventeen years during and after the Revolution; he was also Vice President of the United States under Jefferson and Madison.

1. George Washington Clinton, who married Ann Floyd. They had a son George William Floyd Clinton; with him this line ran out.

2. Mary Clinton, became the wife of "Citizen" Edmund Ganet, the French Minister to the United States

XXIV Charles Clinton, the second son of General James Clinton, married Elizabeth Mulliner, also written Molyneaux; he was a physician.

1. Alexander Clinton (1795-1878)

2. Maria DeWitt (1791-1883); she became Mrs. Robert Gourlay

3. Anna E. (initial only) who became Mrs. James Foster Jr.

XXV Dr. Alexander Clinton was the son of Charles and the grandson of General James Clinton.

1. Mary Elizabeth, Mrs. John Bleecher; she had one child

2. Adeline Archer, Mrs. Thomas E. Brown; she had five children

3. Alexander James Clinton first married Sophie E. Vese(Vose?) and later Annie J. Nestall. They had one son Charles A. Clinton, and three daughters.

4. Anna E., Mrs. Theodore Wilmerding; they had five children.

5. Catherine Spencer, who died in infancy

6. Charles W. Clinton married Emily de Silver Gorsuch. He is an architect in New York.

7. DeWitt Clinton married Elizabeth S. Burtham; their sons were DeWitt, and Roland B. Clinton.

XXIV DeWitt Clinton was the third son of General James Clinton. He became United States Senator, Mayor of New York City, the Governor of New York under whom the Erie Canal was built. As a youth he was the first student to enroll in Columbia University after the name had been changed from Kings College; he first married Maria Franklin and later Catherine Jones. In all there were ten children of which three died in infancy, four others left no issue and the other three were:

1. Charles A. Clinton; his wife was Catherine Hone; of the four children, three died without issue; the other one was Catherine, Mrs. J. M. Carville, who had one daughter.

2. George William Clinton (1807-1885) married Laura Catherine Spencer.

3. Mary, married Judge David S. Jones of Long Island

XXIV George Clinton, the fourth son of General James Clinton, was a member of congress from New York City. His wife was Hannah Franklin. His children were:

1. Mary Caroline, she became Mrs. Overing.

2. Franklin Clinton died in infancy

3. Julia Matilda, she became Mrs. Tallmadge, and later Mrs. Joseph Foster

.

Their children were Clinton Talmadge, Mary Foster, James Foster, and Clinton Foster

XXV George William Clinton, second son of Governor DeWitt Clinton, was a writer on judicial and scientific subjects, Judge of the Municipal Court of Buffalo, and by avocation a botanist. He searched out and named many new plants. He had seven children of which DeWitt and Elizabeth left no children. The others were:

1. Charles A. Clinton (1837-1885) married Mary L. Prather; they had a son George W. Clinton

2. Spencer Clinton (1859-1885);he married Sarah Reilley

3. Catherine (1841-1881) became Mrs. A. J. Wheeler; she had three children.

4. Mary Natalie (1844-1912) became Mrs. A. R. Baldwin; she had one daughter.

5. George Clinton (1847-----); he married Alice Thornton

XXVI Spencer Clinton

1. DeWitt Clinton; he had no children

2. Marshall Clinton

3. Anna; she became Mrs. Wilcox; she has two daughters

4. Natalie; she became Mrs. T. Wright; she has one son and one daughter. 5. Ethel; she became Mrs. Nelson Russell; she had two sons and one daughter.

6. Spencer Clinton; he has one daughter

7. Catherine; she became Mrs. Smith

XXVII Marshall Clinton, second son of Spencer Clinton is a physician; his children are:

1. DeWitt Clinton

2. Karl Clinton

3. Marcia; she became Mrs. Phillips

4. Marshall Clinton

XXVI George Clinton, third son of George William Clinton and grandson of Governor DeWitt Clinton was Chairman of the New York Waterways Commission which undertook the widening of the Erie Canal.

1. Catherine Clinton

2. Elizabeth, she became Mrs. C. D. Richmond; she had two daughters.

3. George Clinton; he married Sophie Klein; he has no children

The information concerning the descendants of Charge Clinton 1690-1773) was mostly obtained from the Life of Governor DeWitt Clinton by James Renwick, a report by Charles A. Clinton at the Centennial Celebration of Little Britain, N.Y., and correspondence with Miss Catherine Clinton of Buffalo, N.Y.



OTHER BRANCHES

Genealogical and biographical records are notably incomplete. They are good for what they contain, but the absence of names and dates proves nothing. Public records generally fail to furnish adequate evidence of relationships; these can be conclusively established only when family records supplement public records.

Nothing has been found to show the migration of history of the Clintons who resided in the Carolinas during the revolutionary period. Tradition connects the Clintons of Ipswick, Mass., New Haven, Conn. Dutchese County, N.Y. and those of Pennsylvania. It cannot be shown that Lawrence and Rachael Clinton were the ancestors of all of them; there is much to indicate that their descendants were rather numerous. Unfortunately we have no list of the names of their sons; but Lawrence Clinton,the father of the Lawrence born in 1737, Jocob Clinton born in 1705, Joseph Clinton, the father of the William born in 1726, and Thomas Clinton the father of the Thomas who was born in 1719 were all of the age of his younger sons or elder grandsons. By comparing his age with that of the Earls of Lincoln, it would seem best to assign him to the XX generation, the same as that of Theophilus, Norreys, and William. The persons listed above would be of the XXI generation, and the William born in 1726 would be of the XXII. If he is the same as the Capt. William Clinton of Chester County, Pennsylvania, who was active in the Indian War of 1747, we may fairly place Charles Clinton of Frederick County, Md, William Clinton of Lendon Grove, Chester County, James Clinton of London, Britain, Chester County, and Samuel Clinton the boat-builder of Philadelphia in the XXIII generation. Most of the revolutionary soldiers were of the next or XXIV generation.

There is no definite connection in the record between Capt. William Clinton of Chester County, Pa and Capt. Charles Clinton of Frederick County, Md. (who migrated on westward by stages, as we have seen on pages 32 and 33). They are, however, associated in our minds because of their personal traits and history.

Although Pennsylvania was one of the last colonies to be settled, its development was so rapid that at the time of the French and Indian war, it was in the front rank and was scarcely behind any of the others in population and wealth. Besides being a refuge of many oppressed people of Europe, it was looked upon as the land of opportunity for settlers from the older colonies. A very considerable part of her English speaking people came from Connecticut. Under the generous rule of William Penn peace and prosperity reigned; his sons were much less successful, and Pennsylvania became one of the principal areas of conflict in the Indian Wars.

As we have already shown, William Clinton was schooled in the hard lessons of frontier life. He was first a Captain in the Chester County forces for defence against the Indians in 1747-1748. In 1758, he was a Lieutenant in Col. James Burd's Battalion which was a part of the army under General Forbes that captured Fort Dequesne and practically concluded the war in America. the knowledge gained by him in this expedition must have aroused his interest in plans of the English to occupy an settle western Pennsylvania and the Ohio Valley. We would expect some of his sons to share his interest in such an enterprise. As we have seen he died about 1765 about three years after he had purchased an extensive tract of land near Harrisburg. Capt. Charles Clinton showed the same restless character and enterprise. At first we find him (1771)at Antietam (now) Washington, County, Md.; then (1775 and 1776) we find him in Cumberland Hundred (District), now a part of Allegheny County, Md., about a hundred miles west in the most mountainous part of the state; later (1784?) we find him at Uniontown, Fayette County, Pa. on the Braddock route to Pittsburgh, while there he became a captain of militia and a leader in frontier life. Even in later life he ventured to go on further into the newer frontier of Greene County. Circumstances already listed make it fairly certain that he was the ancestor of the following lines; he was a contemporary on Henry Pelham-Clinton and of General James Clinton, and we therefore assign him to the XXIII generation counting from the Clinton who served William the Conqueror.

[HANDWRITTEN PAGE INSERTED HERE

Again, see Charles Clintons' war records inserted at P. 12.

He had no son Thomas. The only Charles Clinton who was over 16 in 1790 was himself.

His son named Charles was not born until Sept. 2, 1797. A child of his second wife Eleanor Gaper and himself. This child, Charles, probably did move to Wellsville, Ohio in 1828 for that is when Charles Sr. died.

For other children turn back to inserted bible record Mrs. G. T. Talley 147 Dempster St. Evanston, ILL]

XXIII Charles Clinton,he resided successively in Frederick, Washington, and Allegheny Counties in Maryland then in Fayette and Green Counties, Pa; he was a captain of Maryland Militia which participated in the revolutionary War; he as later (1792) Captain of Militia in Fayette County.

1. John Clinton (_____1838)

2. Thomas Clinton (1856); he was a revolutionary soldier in the Fourth Maryland Regiment.

3. Charles C. Clinton; he was over 16 in 1790; he was a resident of Wellsville, Ohio from about 1828 until his death in1864.

4. He had two daughters in 1790

5. He had two more sons and one more daughter who were under 10 in 1800

[HANDWRITTEN PAGE INSERTED HERE

Again, this John Clinton was the brother not the son of Charles Clinton.

See Wm. Clinton Will inserted at p. 11 showing he ordered goods shipped to son John in Charleston, S.C.

John son of Charles Clinton could not possibly have served in the Rev. as he was born according to the bible records Nov. 24, 1771.

John, son of William and brother of Charles undoubtedly had a son John who served as a private in the Rev. but such a person was a nephew of Charles. He would normally have served from Charleston, S.C. for his father lived there.

John son of Charles was in (1790) a Lieut in the Light Infantry of Fayette Co. Pa. where his father was a capt in the Penn. Militia

XXIV John Clinton; he served the revolutionary cause at Charleston S. C. as a private in the Second Battalion of Philadelphia Militia; later (1790)_he was a lieutenant of Light Infantry of the Fayette County, Pa Militia; he lived in Fayette County until some time after 1800; in 1816 he was in Jefferson County Ohio and in 1820 he lived in Columbiana County (now Carroll) County, Ohio; his estate was settled in 1842 at which time the following appear as his heirs:

1. Margaret, Mrs. Daniel VanTilburgh

2. Able Clinton (1829); his heirs were Peter and Priscilla.

3. Priscilla, Mrs. Abraham Crab; in 1830 she had one son 5-10, and two sons and one daughter under 5.

4. Thomas Clinton; he died before 1842; his heirs were Margaret, Jacob W. John, Priscilla and Eliza. the last two were born respectively in 1825 and 1828

5. John Clinton 1798-1884.

6. Edward Clinton; his first wife, whose first name was Eva died before 1840; at that time they had one son and one daughter under 10 and one daughter under 5. He married Hester Baxter Oct. 28, 1841

7. Nancy, Mrs. William Norris

8. ________________ Mrs. Joseph Figley

9. William Clinton (1804-1868)

10. DeWitt Clinton of whom there is no later record

XXV John Clinton, Jr. the third son of John Clinton, above. He migrated to Jefferson County, Iowa. In 1844, and resided there until his death in 1884.

1. Thankful, Mrs. Joseph Snively, her grandson Mr. Charles Snively still resides in Carroll County, Ohio

2. Priscilla, Mrs. John Carter; a large number of their descendants still reside in Ringold County, Iowa and in Lancaster County, Nebr.

3. Charles W. Clinton (1828-1905); in 1850 he joined the gold rush to California; he left a diary giving account of several conflicts with the Indians while on a covered wagon journey across the continent; he had two daughters, Malissa and Esther, Mrs. Wills; the latter had a family of several children; he had one son Charles DeWitt Clinton, who was unmarried in 1905.

4. William James Clinton (1830-1909) (1902?)

5. Phoebe, Mrs. Caleb Martin; her descendants still reside in Davis County, Iowa

6. Libbie, Mrs. Louis Cipher

7. Margaret, Mrs. Shadford, a daughter, Maud. Mrs. William Johnson, still resides in Agency Iowa

8. Liddie, Mrs. Urey; she died in 1933 at the age of 91.

9. Amanda, Mrs. John Aten(?); her sons were Blanchard and Harley; the former was killed in early manhood; her daughters Mary, Carrie, Iola, and Mable married, and some of them still reside in Council Bluffs, Iowa.

10. Eliza, Mrs. Aldrich

It will be noted that pioneering and preference for frontier life persisted through several generations of Charles Clinton's descendants.

XXV William Clinton (1804-1868); he was the fifth son of John Clinton who settled in Ohio and died in 1838. He was a blacksmith in Augusta Township of Carroll County. His wife Catherine was born in Maryland. The census record shows that his family was as follows:

1. John Clinton (1832_____) - he was a blacksmith

2. Margaret

3. Priscilla

4. Clarissa

5. Daniel

6. Melville

7. William Hurlbut

8. Mary E.

XXVI William James Clinton (1830-1909); he was the second son of John, and the grandson of John who settled in Ohio. He married Anna Haskell who on her fathers side was a descendent of General Israel Putman. They resided first in Davis County, Ia, then in Atchison County Ne., then in Nodaway County, MO (?), then in Gage County, Nebr. and then in Shenandoah, Ia where they both died.

1. Mattie, Mrs. Jacob Branstine; they had a large family ; she now resides near Los Angeles, CA DeWitt Clinton, 1861-1935; when he died he resided at Glenmont, Colo.

3. Sarah, Mrs. Frank Whitcomb;their sons are George, Ernest, and William; their daughters are Christine (Mrs. Rose) and Eileen, who now resides at Beatrice, Nebr.

4. Guy Clinton 1867 ------)

5. Phoebe May (1869-1904)

6. Della Elizabeth 1871-1904; she became Mrs. Jesse George

7. Ella Iola (Mrs. Isaac Greer) she lives at Seattle, WA

8. Emma Lahuna(?) who is a Methodist missionary in India

XXVII

Dewitt Clinton, his wife was Nellie Williams

1. John Henry Clinton; he resides at East Helena Mont. He has one daughter, Lucille

2. Caroline, Mrs. Runyan; she has two daughters, Alice and Annabell.

3. Chester Clinton

4. Charlie Clinton

XXVII Guy Clinton; his wife's name was Edna B. Kindt. they reside at Washington, D.C.

1. Lahuna Elizabeth, Mrs. W. D. Hollewell Doris Edna Clinton

Transcribed by Joanne Clinton Truman

Email: jmisky@verizon.net

Return to American Douglas History or Home Page